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  1. #1611

    Broadfin shark

    The broadfin shark (Lamiopsis temminckii) is a species of requiem shark, in the family Carcharhinidae. It is found in the tropical waters of the Indo-Pacific oceans, between latitudes 24° N and 4° S, from the surface to a depth of 50 m. It can reach a length of about 1.7 m. It is viviparous, and is not known to be dangerous to people.
    Carcharias_temminckii_by_muller_and_henle.jpg

    Sliteye shark
    The sliteye shark (Loxodon macrorhinus) is a species of requiem shark, in the family Carcharhinidae, and the only member of its genus.[1] It is found in the tropical waters of the Indo-West Pacific between latitudes 34° N and 30° S, from depths of 7 to 100 m.[1] It can reach a length of about 95 cm.
    Loxodon_macrorhinus_csiro-nfc.jpg

    Caribbean sharpnose shark
    The Caribbean sharpnose shark (Rhizoprionodon porosus) is a requiem shark, and part of the family Carcharhinidae. It is found in the tropical waters of the western Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean, between latitudes 28° N and 40° S, from the surface to a depth of 500 m. It can reach a length of about 1.1 m.
    Rhizoprionodon_porosus.JPG

    Spadenose shark
    The spadenose shark (Scoliodon laticaudus) is a species of requiem shark, and part of the family Carcharhinidae. It is common in the tropical Indian and western Pacific Oceans, where it forms large schools in shallow water. A small shark reaching a length of 74 cm (29 in), the spadenose shark is named for its distinctively flattened, triangular snout. It is a predator of small bony fishes and invertebrates. This species exhibits the most advanced mode of viviparity of any fish, in which the developed embryos form a highly complex placental connection to the mother at a very small size. Females breed year-round, giving birth to six to 18 pups after a gestation period of five to six months. The spadenose shark is harmless to humans and is valued by artisanal and commercial fishers for its meat and fins. Its abundance ensures it forms a significant component of many fisheries in South and Southeast Asia. The International Union for Conservation of Nature has assessed this species as Near Threatened.
    800px-Carcharias_laticaudus_by_muller_and_henle.jpg

    Hooktooth shark
    The hooktooth shark (Chaenogaleus macrostoma), is a weasel shark of the family Hemigaleidae, the only member of the genus Chaenogaleus. It is found in the tropical Indo-West Pacific oceans between latitudes 30° N and 10° S, including the Persian Gulf, Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka, Singapore, Thailand, Viet Nam, China, Taiwan, and Java and Sulawesi in Indonesia, from the surface to a depth of 59 meters. It can reach a length of 1 meter.
    Chaenogaleus_macrostoma_Day_-_cropped.jpg

    Sicklefin weasel shark
    The sicklefin weasel shark (Hemigaleus microstoma) is an uncommon species of ground shark in the family Hemigaleidae. It is native to southern India, southern China, and parts of Southeast Asia, living in shallow waters down to a depth of 170 m (560 ft). This lightly built shark is characterized by its very short mouth, broad upper teeth with serrations only on the trailing edge, and strongly sickle-shaped fins with obvious white tips on the two dorsal fins. It is light grey or bronze in colour, often with small white blotches on its sides, and reaches a maximum known length of 1.1 m (3.6 ft).
    1280px-Hemigaleus_microstoma_ranong_1.jpg Hemigaleus_microstoma_ranong_3.jpg

    Snaggletooth shark
    The snaggletooth shark, or fossil shark (Hemipristis elongata), is a species of weasel shark, in the family Hemigaleidae, and the only extant member of the genus Hemipristis. It is found in the Indo-West Pacific, including the Red Sea, from southeast Africa to the Philippines, north to China, and south to Australia, at depths of from 1 to 130 m. This shark can be found near the bottom of the water column of coastal areas, but can be found at continental and insular shelves.[1] Its length is up to 240 cm (7.87 ft) .[2] Despite being only vulnerable to extinction, this shark is very rarely seen.
    Hemipristis_elongata_csiro-nfc.jpg

  2. #1612

    Deepwater catshark

    The deepwater catshark[1] (Apristurus profundorum) is a catshark of the family Scyliorhinidae, found in the western Atlantic from Delaware Bay to Suriname, and in the eastern Atlantic from Morocco to northwest Africa
    Apristurus_profundorum.jpg Deepwater_catshark.jpg

    Australian blackspotted catshark
    The Australian blackspotted catshark (Aulohalaelurus labiosus) is a catshark of the family Scyliorhinidae in the order Carcharhiniformes. It is endemic to Western Australia in the eastern Indian Ocean between latitudes 28° S and 36° S. It can grow up to 67 cm.
    Aulohalaelurus_labiosus_csiro-nfc.jpg

    Whitefin swellshark
    The whitefin swellshark (Cephaloscyllium albipinnum) is a little-known species of catshark, belonging to the family Scyliorhinidae, endemic to southeastern Australia. It is found 126–554 m (413–1,818 ft) down, on the outer continental shelf and upper continental slope. Reaching 1.1 m (3.6 ft) in length, this shark has a very thick body and a short, broad, flattened head with a large mouth. It is characterized by a dorsal color pattern of dark saddles and blotches over a brown to gray background, and light fin margins. When threatened the whitefin swellshark can inflate itself with water or air to increase its size.[2] Reproduction is oviparous. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has assessed this species as Near Threatened; this catshark is a frequent bycatch of trawls, and there is evidence that its population is declining.
    Cephaloscyllium_albipinnum_csiro-nfc.jpg

    Cook's swellshark
    The Cook’s swellshark (Cephaloscyllium cooki) is a little-known species of catshark, belonging to the family Scyliorhinidae. This shark is found in the Arafura Sea at a depth of 223–300 m (732–984 ft). It is a stocky-bodied shark with a short, broad head and a large mouth, and can be identified by the eight dark, pale-edged saddles along its grayish brown body and tail. The maximum known length of this species is 30 cm (12 in). Like other swellsharks, it can inflate itself with water or air when threatened.
    Cephaloscyllium_cooki_csiro-nfc.jpg

    Blotchy swellshark
    The blotchy swellshark is known to inhabit the northwestern Pacific Ocean from Hokkaido, Japan southward to Taiwan, including the Yellow Sea.[7] Its range may extend as far as New Guinea.[1] This abundant species is a bottom-dweller that inhabits rocky reefs on the continental shelf, at depths of 90–200 m (300–660 ft)
    800px-Cephaloscyllium_umbratile2.jpg

    Australian reticulate swellshark
    The Australian reticulate swellshark (Cephaloscyllium hiscosellum) is a little-known species of catshark, belonging to the family Scyliorhinidae. It is found off the coast of northwestern Australia at depths of 290–420 m (950–1,380 ft). This shark has a stocky body and a short, wide head with a capacious mouth. It is characterized by a striking dorsal color pattern of dark brown lines that trace a series of hollow saddles and narrow rings, on a light background. Like other swellsharks, this species can inflate itself when threatened. Its reproduction is oviparous.[1
    Cephaloscyllium_hiscosellium_csiro-nfc.jpg

    Draughtsboard shark
    The draughtsboard shark is found only in the coastal waters around New Zealand, including the Snares, the Chatham Islands, and Stewart Island, where it is particularly common. It typically occurs at depths of 0 to 400 m (0 to 1,312 ft) on continental and insular shelves, though it has been recorded from as far down as 673 m (2,208 ft). This shark is a bottom-dweller that favors rocky reefs and adjacent areas of soft substrate. Adult males and females segregate from each other
    800px-Carpetshark.jpg

    Australian swellshark
    The Australian swellshark inhabits the continental shelf of southern Australia, from the Recherche Archipelago off Western Australia to Jervis Bay in New South Wales, including Tasmania.[1] It is commonly found on or near the bottom amongst rocky reefs or seaweed beds, from close to shore to a depth of 220 m (720 ft)
    800px-Cephaloscyllium_laticeps_refuge_cove.jpg 800px-Cephaloscyllium_laticeps_shack_bay.jpg

    Indian swellshark
    The Indian swellshark (Cephaloscyllium silasi) is a catshark of the family Scyliorhinidae found in the western Indian Ocean from Quilon, India and Sauqira Bay, Oman between latitudes 16° N and 10° N, from the surface to 300 m. It grows to about 36 cm in length, and can expand its body by taking in air or water to make it appear larger to predators.
    Cephaloscyllium_silasi_quilon.jpg

    Australian sawtail catshark
    The Australian sawtail catshark (Figaro boardmani) is a common species of catshark, and part of the family Scyliorhinidae, endemic to southern Australian waters. It is found on or near the bottom of the outer continental shelf and upper continental slope, at depths of 85 to 823 m (279 to 2,700 ft). This slim-bodied species is characterized by crests of enlarged dermal denticles along both the dorsal and ventral edges of its caudal fin and caudal peduncle, along with a color pattern of broad, dark saddles outlined in white. It can grow to 61 cm (24 in) in length. The Australian sawtail catshark feeds mainly on fishes, crustaceans, and cephalopods. Females are oviparous and lay eggs enclosed by capsules. This species is often caught incidentally by commercial bottom trawl fisheries, but is not significantly threatened by fishing activity. Thus, it has been assessed as of Least Concern by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).
    Figaro_boardmani_csiro-nfc.jpg

  3. #1613

    Roughtail catshark

    The roughtail catshark or marbled catshark (Galeus arae) is a common species of catshark, part of the family Scyliorhinidae. It is found at a depth of 36–702 m (118–2,303 ft) in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean Sea, from North Carolina to Costa Rica. Individuals of different sexes and ages are segregated to some degree. A small species not exceeding 33 cm (13 in) in length, the roughtail catshark has a slender body with a marbled color pattern of dark saddles and spots, and a prominent crest of enlarged dermal denticles along the dorsal edge of its caudal fin. This species feeds mainly on shrimp and is oviparous. It is caught incidentally in shrimp trawls, though trawl fisheries within its range mostly do not operate at the depths it inhabits. As a result, the International Union for Conservation of Nature has listed it under Least Concern.
    Catshark_oedv2.jpg

    Gecko catshark
    The gecko catshark (Galeus eastmani) is a species of catshark, part of the family Scyliorhinidae, native to the northwestern Pacific Ocean from southern Japan to Taiwan, and possibly also off Vietnam. It is a common, demersal species found at depths of 100–900 m (330–2,950 ft). Its body is slender, with a pattern of dark saddles and blotches. The dorsal and caudal fins are edged in white, and there is a prominent crest of enlarged dermal denticles along the dorsal edge of the caudal fin. The gecko catshark is a schooling, opportunistic predator of bony fishes, cephalopods, and crustaceans. It is oviparous, with females producing two vase-shaped egg capsules at a time. This species is captured as bycatch, but does not appear to be threatened by fishery activities at present and has been assessed as Least Concern by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).
    Pristiurus_eastmani_by_jordan_and_snyder.jpg

    Slender sawtail catshark,
    The slender sawtail catshark (Galeus gracilis) is a little-known species of catshark, part of the family Scyliorhinidae, endemic to northern Australia. It is found over the continental slope in 290–470 m (950–1,540 ft) on water. Growing to 34 cm (13 in) long, this shark has a slim gray body with four dark saddle markings below the dorsal fins and on the caudal fin, as well as a prominent crest of enlarged dermal denticles along the dorsal edge of the caudal fin. The slender sawtail catshark is not valued by fisheries but is taken as bycatch. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) presently lacks enough information to assess its conservation status.
    Galeus_gracilis_csiro-nfc.jpg

    Blackmouth catshark
    Found on or near the bottom, the blackmouth catshark favors a muddy habitat.[12] There is little evidence for segregation by sex.[9][13] A number of studies in the northern and western Mediterranean have reported that adults occur deeper than juveniles.[10][12][13][14] Other studies though have found no such pattern. It is possible that areas such as the waters off southern France offer a habitat suitable for sharks of all ages.[15] Another explanation with some scientific support is that adults are most common at intermediate depths, while young sharks are restricted to shallower water and both adults and juveniles are found in deeper water. If true, the age-depth inconsistencies observed from previous research could have resulted from incomplete depth sampling
    Galeus_melastomus_Sardinia.jpg Galeus_melastomus_Gervais.jpg

    Blacktip sawtail catshark
    The blacktip sawtail catshark (Galeus sauteri) is a species of catshark, and part of the family Scyliorhinidae, found off the coasts of Taiwan and the Philippines. It is demersal in nature and occurs deeper than 60 m (200 ft). Growing up to 46 cm (18 in) long, this slim-bodied species is characterized by its plain brownish dorsal coloration with dark tips on the dorsal and caudal fins, and a prominent crest of enlarged dermal denticles on the upper edge of the caudal fin. It is oviparous, with females producing encapsulated eggs two at a time year-round. The blacktip sawtail catshark is caught incidentally in bottom trawls and used for fishmeal in Taiwan. However, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) currently lacks enough information to assess its conservation status.
    Pristiurus_sauteri_by_jordan_and_richardson.jpg

  4. #1614

    Lined catshark

    The lined catshark or banded catshark (Halaelurus lineatus) is a species of catshark, belonging to the family Scyliorhinidae. It is found in the waters off the coasts of Beira, Mozambique, to East London, and South Africa between latitudes 19°S and 31°S, from the surface to 290 m. It can grow up to 56 cm in length. Habitat: Warm- temperate and subtropical waters; shelf and uppermost slope on soft bottoms, from close inshore at the surfline to 290 m deep. Common off Natal. Feeds on small crustaceans, bony fish and cephalopods. Probably lays eggs, with up to 8 egg cases per oviduct; eggs retained until embryos reach advanced stage of development.
    halaelurus_lineatus_658w.jpg

    Tiger catshark
    The tiger catshark (Halaelurus natalensis) is a species of catshark, belonging to the family Scyliorhinidae. It is found over sandy areas and near reef peripheries off South Africa and perhaps Mozambique, from close to shore to usually no deeper than 100 m (330 ft). Reaching a length of 50 cm (20 in), this small, slim shark has a broad, flattened head with an upturned snout tip. It can additionally be identified by its dorsal colour pattern of ten dark brown saddles on a yellowish brown background.
    halaelurus_natalensis_658w.jpg

    Quagga catshark
    The quagga catshark (Halaelurus quagga) is a species of catshark, belonging to the family Scyliorhinidae. A small, slim-bodied shark reaching 37 cm (15 in) in length, it has a distinctive color pattern of narrow, dark brown vertical bars, which resemble those of the quagga. Its head is short and flattened, with a pointed snout tip that is not upturned.
    260px-Halaelurus_quagga_indian_museum.jpg 440px-Halaelurus_quagga_fb1.jpg

    Natal shyshark
    The Natal shyshark, eastern shyshark, or happy chappie,[2] (Haploblepharus kistnasamyi) is a species of catshark, belonging to the family Scyliorhinidae. It was once regarded as the "Natal" form of the puffadder shyshark (H. edwardsii). This shark is endemic to a small area off South Africa from the Western Cape to KwaZulu-Natal. It is found close to the coast, from the surf zone to a depth of 30 m (98 ft), and has benthic habits. Reaching 50 cm (20 in) in length, the Natal shyshark is similar to the puffadder shyshark in appearance but has a stockier body, less flattened head, a compressed caudal peduncle, and a different color pattern. Rare and under threat from habitat degradation and commercial fishing, it has been assessed as Critically Endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).
    haploblepharus_sp_natal_658.jpg
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  5. #1615

    Dark shyshark

    The dark shyshark or pretty Happy (Haploblepharus pictus) is a species of catshark, belonging to the family Scyliorhinidae, endemic to the temperate waters off southern Namibia and western South Africa. It is benthic in nature and inhabits shallow, inshore waters and favors rocky reefs and kelp forests. Growing to 60 cm (24 in) long, this small, stocky shark has a wide, flattened head with a rounded snout and a large flap of skin extending from before the nostrils to the mouth. Its dorsal coloration is extremely variable and may feature black-edged orange to blackish saddles and/or white spots on a light brown to nearly black background.
    Dark_shyshark_-_Haploblepharus_pictus_D.Warmerdam.jpg

    Salamander shark
    The salamander shark or salamander catshark (Parmaturus pilosus) is a little known catshark that inhabits a range from Japan and the East China Sea, on the upper to middle continental slope at depths of 358–895 m. Specimens of this species can attain a total length of at least 64 cm. This catshark is a potential bycatch of trawl fisheries operating within its range, but no details are available. There are high levels of squalene in this catshark's liver. The reproduction of this catshark is oviparous.
    e807219fe9a12f83b4d529a9ed9ae049--salamander-facts-kids-ca.jpg

    Filetail catshark
    The filetail catshark (Parmaturus xaniurus) is an Eastern Pacific endemic deepwater catshark ranging from Oregon to the Gulf of California. Adults are epibenthic and found near areas of rocky vertical relief over soft mud bottoms on the outer continental shelf and upper slope at depths of 91 to 1,251 m, juveniles are mesopelagic, found around 500 m off the bottom in waters over 1,000 m deep. Reaches a maximum size of 60 cm TL. An oviparous species, females deposit eggcases throughout the year with concentrated reproductive output July through September. There is no information available on the age and growth, longevity, fecundity, abundance or mortality of this species. It is not targeted by commercial fisheries or utilized for human consumption, but is known to be incidental catch in longline and bottom trawl fisheries, although no specific data is available.
    Parmaturus_xaniurus_NOAA.jpg

    Onefin catshark
    The onefin catshark (Pentanchus profundicolus) is a species of catshark, and part of the family Scyliorhinidae. It is the only member of its genus.
    538324e68a256dfdbdcfb4ff7201b9ed.jpg Pentanchus_profundicolus_by_smith.png

    Small-spotted catshark
    The small-spotted catshark (Scyliorhinus canicula), also known as the lesser-spotted dogfish, Rough-hound, or Morgay (in Scotland and Cornwall),[1] is a catshark of the family Scyliorhinidae. It is found on the continental shelves and the uppermost continental slopes off the coasts of Norway and the British Isles south to Senegal and in the Mediterranean, between latitudes 63° N and 12° N. It can grow up to a length of 1 m (3 ft 3 in), and it can weigh more than 2 kg (4.4 lb).[2] It is found primarily over sandy, gravelly, or muddy bottoms from depths of a few metres down to 400 m.[3] S. canicula is one of the most abundant elasmobranchs in the Northeast Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea. The majority of the populations are stable in most areas.
    800px-Scyliorhinus_canicula.jpg

  6. #1616

    Chain catshark

    The chain catshark or chain dogfish (Scyliorhinus retifer) is a small, reticulated catshark that is biofluorescent. The species is common in the Northwest Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean.[2] It is harmless and rarely encountered by humans.[3] It has very similar reproductive traits to the small-spotted catshark (S. canicula).[4]
    Scyliorhinus_retifer_SI.jpg

    Carolina hammerhead
    The Carolina hammerhead, (Sphyrna gilberti) is a species of hammerhead shark, and part of the family Sphyrnidae, found in the western Atlantic Ocean. Their pupping grounds are off the coast of South Carolina. It was formally described in 2013.[1]
    Little is known about the habits of the species. It is a sister species to S. lewini. The Carolina hammerhead is named in honor of Carter Gilbert, who unknowingly recorded the first known specimen of the shark off Charleston, South Carolina in 1967.[2] Dr. Gilbert, who was the curator of the Florida Museum of Natural History from 1961-1998, caught what he believed was an anomalous scalloped hammerhead shark with 10 fewer vertebrae than a typical scalloped hammerhead. It was not confirmed to be a different species altogether until Quattro's discovery in 2013.
    image_1531_2e-Sphyrna-gilberti.jpg hammerhead.jpg

    Great hammerhead
    The great hammerhead inhabits tropical waters around the world, between the latitudes of 40°N and 37°S. In the Atlantic Ocean, it is found from North Carolina to Uruguay, including the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea, and from Morocco to Senegal, and the Mediterranean Sea. It is found all along the rim of the Indian Ocean, and in the Pacific Ocean from the Ryukyu Islands to Australia, New Caledonia, and French Polynesia, and from southern Baja California to Peru.[2] It may occur off Gambia, Guinea, Mauritania, Sierra Leone, and Western Sahara, but this has not been confirmed.[1] Great hammerheads may be found from inshore waters of less than 1 m (3.3 ft) deep, to a depth of 80 m (260 ft) offshore. They favor coral reefs, but also inhabit continental shelves, island terraces, lagoons, and deep water near land. They are migratory; populations off Florida and in the South China Sea have been documented moving closer to the poles in the summer.[3
    Great_hammerhead2.jpg

    Bonnethead
    The bonnethead shark or shovelhead (Sphyrna tiburo) is a small member of the hammerhead shark genus Sphyrna, and part of the family Sphyrnidae. It is an abundant species on the American littoral, and the only shark species known to display sexual dimorphism in the morphology of the head.
    Sphyrna_tiburo_SI.jpg Sphyrna_tiburo_SI3.jpg

    Smalleye hammerhead
    The smalleye hammerhead, golden hammerhead, or curry shark (Sphyrna tudes) is a small species of hammerhead shark, belonging to the family Sphyrnidae. This species is common in the shallow coastal waters of the western Atlantic Ocean, from Venezuela to Uruguay. It favors muddy habitats with poor visibility, reflected by its relatively small eyes. Adult males and juveniles are schooling and generally found apart from the solitary adult females. Typically reaching 1.2–1.3 m (3.9–4.3 ft) in length, this shark has a unique, bright golden color on its head, sides, and fins, which was only scientifically documented in the 1980s. As in all hammerheads, its head is flattened and laterally expanded into a hammer-shaped structure called the cephalofoil, which in this species is wide and long with an arched front margin bearing central and lateral indentations.
    Sphyrna_tudes2.jpg

    Whiskery shark
    The whiskery shark (Furgaleus macki) is a species of houndshark, belonging to the family Triakidae, and the only member of its genus. This common shark inhabits the Australian continental shelf from Western Australia to the Bass Strait, to a depth of 220 m (720 ft). It is demersal in habits and prefers rocky and vegetated habitats. Stout-bodied and almost "humpbacked" in form, the whiskery shark can be distinguished from all other members of its family by the presence of long nasal barbels. Its two moderately large dorsal fins are roughly equal in size. It is brownish gray above and lighter below, with a pattern of darker saddles and blotches in younger sharks. This species reaches 1.6 m (5.2 ft) in length.
    Furgaleus_macki_csiro-nfc.jpg

    School shark
    The school shark (Galeorhinus galeus) is a houndshark of the family Triakidae, and the only member of the genus Galeorhinus. Common names also include tope shark, and snapper shark. It is found worldwide in temperate seas at depths down to about 800 m (2,600 ft). It can grow to nearly 2 m (6 ft 7 in) long. It feeds both in midwater and near the seabed, and its reproduction is ovoviviparous. This shark is caught in fisheries for its flesh, its fins, and its liver, which has a very high vitamin A content. The IUCN has classified this species as "vulnerable" in its Red List of Threatened Species.
    Galeorhinus_galeus_SI3.jpg

  7. #1617

    Japanese topeshark

    The Japanese topeshark (Hemitriakis japanica) is a species of houndshark, in the family Triakidae. It can reach a length of up to 1.1 m. It is found in the subtropical northwest Pacific from China, Taiwan, Korea, and Japan, between latitudes 40° N and 21° N.
    800px-Hemitriakis_japanica2.jpg

    Gummy shark
    The gummy shark (Mustelus antarcticus) also known as the Australian smooth hound, flake, and smooth dog-shark, is a shark in the family Triakidae. It is a slender, grey shark with white spots along the body and flat, plate-like teeth for crushing its prey. It has a maximum length between 157 cm (male) and 175 cm (female). It feeds on crustaceans, marine worms, small fish, and cephalopods. Gummy sharks are found in the waters around southern Australia, from Shark Bay in Western Australia to Port Stephens in New South Wales, from the surface down to a depth of 350 m. The reproduction of gummy sharks is ovoviviparous.
    Mustelus_antarcticus1.jpg

    Starry smooth-hound
    The starry smooth-hound (Mustelus asterias) is a houndshark of the family Triakidae. It is found on the continental shelves of the northeast Atlantic, between latitudes 61° N and 16° N, from the surface to a depth of 200 m (660 ft). It can grow up to a length of 1.4 m (4 ft 7 in).
    Mustelus_asterias.jpg

  8. #1618

    Sicklefin smooth-hound

    The sicklefin smooth-hound (Mustelus lunulatus) is a houndshark of the family Triakidae. It is found on the continental shelves of the eastern Pacific, between latitudes 33° N and 7° N. It can reach a length of up to 1.7 m (5 ft 7 in). The reproduction of this shark is ovoviviparous.[
    Mustelus_lunulatus_SI2.jpg

    Starspotted smooth-hound
    The starspotted smooth-hound (Mustelus manazo) is a houndshark of the family Triakidae. It is found in the western Indian Ocean between latitudes 45° N and 10° S, from the surface to a depth of 360 m. The reproduction of this shark is Ovoviviparous.
    Manazo.jpg

    Speckled smooth-hound
    The speckled smooth-hound (Mustelus mento) is a houndshark of the family Triakidae. It is found on the continental shelf of the eastern Pacific, between latitudes 0° and 54° S, at depths between 16 and 50 m (52 and 164 ft). It can reach a length of 130 cm (51 in). Collectively with certain other species of shark, it is known as "tollo".
    Mumen_u0.jpg

    Common smooth-hound
    The common smooth-hound (Mustelus mustelus) is a houndshark of the family Triakidae. It is found in the eastern Atlantic Ocean from the British Isles to South Africa, and in the Mediterranean Sea, Madeira, and the Canary Islands at depths ranging from 5 m to 625 m (although they usually stay at depths between 5-50m). While they can grow to 200 cm, their usual maximum size is 150 cm. They commonly grow to 100–120 cm with a birth length around 35 cm. The reproduction of commons smooth-hounds is viviparous.
    Mustelus_mustelus1.jpg

  9. #1619

    Benthophiloides brauneri

    Benthophiloides brauneri is a species of goby, a benthophilic fish native to the fresh and brackish waters of the Black Sea, the Caspian Sea and the Sea of Azov as well as their surrounding rivers and estuaries. Despite the wide distribution, very few observations overall of this fish exist, and just one from the Caspian basin. It has been found in still waters at depths down to around 15 metres (49 ft). Males of this species can reach a length of 7.2 centimetres (2.8 in) SL while females only reach 5.1 centimetres (2.0 in) SL. This fish only lives for one year
    Benthophiloides_brauneri.jpg

    Fourbeard rockling
    The fourbeard rockling (Enchelyopus cimbrius) is a species of lotid fish found in the northern Atlantic Ocean. This species grows to 41 cm (16 in) in total length. It is of minor importance in commercial
    The fourbeard rockling is a bottom-dwelling fish which feeds on crustaceans, polychaete worms, molluscs and other invertebrates.[5] It usually breeds between February and August, releasing the spawn in deep water after which the eggs float towards the surface
    Fourbeard_Rockling,_Newfoundland,_Canada_(5532423744).jpg

    Three-bearded rockling
    The three-bearded rockling (Gaidropsarus vulgaris) is found in European waters from the central Norwegian coast and the Faroe Islands, through the North Sea, and around the British Isles to the region around the western Mediterranean. They can grow to a maximum length of 60 cm (2 ft). Their coloration varies from dusky to pale, with large chocolate-brown spots on the head and body, and fin coloration varies with location. Three barbels, one on the bottom jaw and two on the snout, provide the fish with its common name.
    Gaidropsarus_vulgaris_Gervais.jpg La_Pêche_et_les_poissons_(6266711171).jpg

    Lumpsucker
    Lumpsuckers or lumpfish are mostly small scorpaeniform marine fish of the family Cyclopteridae. They are found in the cold waters of the Arctic, North Atlantic, and North Pacific oceans. The greatest number of species are found in the North Pacific.
    The roe of Cyclopterus lumpus (the lumpsucker or lumpfish to most Europeans and people living along the East Coast of the United States), known as stenbider (literally "stone biter") in Danish, is used extensively in Scandinavian cuisine. The roe is also used as an affordable alternative to the caviar produced by sturgeons.
    800px-Cyclopterus_lumpus_2.JPG

    Great sand eel
    Breeding occurs between March and August. It feeds on plankton, fish larvae, and a vast range of crustaceans
    The great sand eel is native to the eastern North Atlantic from Murmansk (70°N) and Spitzbergen (75°N) southwards to Portugal (38°N) including Iceland and the Baltic Sea. It has not been recorded from the Mediterranean Sea or the Barents Sea.[4] It is to be found from the low water mark down to over 100 m, typically over clean and sandy substrates
    Hyperoplus_lanceolatus.jpg

    Boar Fish
    Capros aper usually lives close to the floor of the sea (demersal), mainly on muddy bottoms or near rocky bottoms or coral. It forms numerous herds at a certain distance from the substrate, but occasionally it can reach a depth of about 700 m, especially at night
    800px-Caproidae_-_Capros_aper.JPG

  10. #1620

    Black Sea sprat

    The Black Sea sprat, Clupeonella cultriventris, is a small fish of the herring family, Clupeidae. It is found in the Black Sea and Sea of Azov and rivers of its basins: Danube, Dniester, Dnieper, Southern Bug, Don, Kuban. It has white-grey flesh and silver-grey scales. A typical size is 10 cm (maximum 15 cm)[2] The life span is of up to 5 years.[2] The peak of its spawning is in April and it can be found in enormous shoals in sea-shores, filled all-round coastal shallows, moving quickly back in the sea at a depth of 6–30 metres. Used for food; it has around 12% fat in flesh.
    3_specimens_of_Clupeonella_cultriventris.jpg

    Brachymystax tumensis
    Brachymystax tumensis, the blunt-snouted lenok,[2] is a salmonid fish distributed in rivers and lakes in Eastern Asia. It was formerly included in the more widespread species Brachymystax lenok (now known as the sharp-snouted lenok), but more recent research based on differences in morphology and genetics have justified a distinction of the two species
    Brachymystax_lenokBMNHM.jpg

    Sakhalin taimen
    The Sakhalin taimen (Parahucho perryi, syn. Hucho perryi), also known as the Japanese huchen, is a large, East Asian species of fish in the salmon family (Salmonidae). It is found in the Primorsky Krai and Khabarovsk regions of eastern Russia, Sakhalin Island, the Kuril Islands and Hokkaido, Japan and inhabits lakes and large rivers. The population has been in general decline for a century at least. Contributory factors include degradation of the environment by logging, oil exploration and change of land use to agriculture. The fish is caught by commercial fishing as bycatch, by recreational anglers and illegally by poaching, and present populations are estimated to be less than 5% of their historic levels. The International Union for Conservation of Nature has rated the fish as being critically endangered.[1] Although initially placed in the genus Hucho, genetics and other evidence has shown that it belongs in its own monotypic genus Parahucho
    Hucho_perryi_Brevoort.jpg

    Black Sea Salmon
    The Black Sea salmon (Salmo labrax) is a fairly small species of salmon, at about 20 inches (510 mm) long on average and rarely reaching over 30 in (760 mm). It inhabits the northern Black Sea coasts and inflowing rivers. There are anadromous, lacustrine and resident river populations.[1] This fish is a close relative of the brown trout. While it is the only native species of Salmo present in the northern Black Sea basin, it may hybridize with (introduced) brown trout in the major rivers.[1] Sea-run populations are currently at low numbers, but the resident river stocks are doing well.
    7.jpg Salabrax.jpg

 

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