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  1. #1741
    Mormyrus kannume

    Common name: Tapir-Rüsselfisch
    Origin: Africa
    Tank Size: min. 200 - 400 cm
    Temperature: 22 - 25 °C
    pH Value: 5.0 - 6.0
    Fish Size: 40-50 cm
    Food: Live food, Frozen food
    Care: Aggressive, Keep single, Nocturnal
    A46440.jpg

    Nomorhamphus liemi

    Origin: Sulawesi
    Tank Size: min. 60 - 100 cm
    Temperature: 22 - 28 °C
    pH Value: 7.0 - 8.0
    Fish Size: 5,5-8 cm
    Food: Dry flakes, Frozen food, Live food
    Care: Sociable, Keep in pairs, Diurnal
    X67705A.jpg

    Nomorhamphus hageni cf.

    Origin: Asia/Australien
    Tank Size: min. 60 - 100 cm
    Temperature: 22 - 25 °C
    pH Value: 7.0 - 8.0
    Fish Size: 6 cm
    Food: Dry flakes, Frozen food, Live food
    Care: Sociable, Keep in pairs, Diurnal
    X67695.jpg

  2. #1742
    Perca fluviatilis

    Origin: Europa
    Tank Size: min. 200 - 400 cm
    Temperature: 10 - 22 °C
    pH Value: 5.0 - 6.0
    Fish Size: 45 cm
    Food: Live food, Frozen food
    Care: Aggressive, Group
    E71055.jpg

    Apteronotus albifrons Gold

    Origin: Variety (South America)
    Tank Size: min. 200 - 400 cm
    Temperature: 22 - 28 °C
    pH Value: 5.0 - 7.0
    Fish Size: 30-40 cm
    Food: Frozen food, Live food
    Care: Aggressive, Keep single, Nocturnal
    S05006.jpg

    Nothobranchius rachovii RED

    Origin: Africa
    Tank Size: min. 40 - 80 cm
    Temperature: 24 - 29 °C
    pH Value: 5.0 - 6.0
    Fish Size: 5 cm
    Food: Frozen food, Live food, Dry flakes
    Care: Aggressive, Keep in pairs, Diurnal
    A50230.jpg

  3. #1743
    Brachyplatystoma flavicans

    Origin: Süd-/Centralamerica
    Tank Size: min. 200 - 400 cm
    Temperature: 22 - 25 °C
    pH Value: 5.0 - 6.0
    Fish Size: 50-60 cm
    Food: Frozen food, Live food, Dry flakes
    Care: Aggressive, Group
    S08235.jpg

    Merodontotus tigrinus

    Origin: Süd-/Centralamerica
    Tank Size: min. 500 cm
    Temperature: 22 - 25 °C
    pH Value: 5.0 - 6.0
    Fish Size: 35-40(70) cm
    Food: Frozen food, Live food, Dry flakes
    Care: Aggressive, Group
    S50405.jpg

    Mochokiella paynei

    Origin: Africa
    Tank Size: min. 40 - 80 cm
    Temperature: 22 - 25 °C
    pH Value: 5.0 - 6.0
    Fish Size: 6-7 cm
    Food; Omnivore
    Care: Sociable, Group, Nocturnal
    A45500.jpg

  4. #1744
    Brachyplatystoma juruense

    Origin: Süd-/Centralamerica
    Tank Size: min. 500 cm
    Temperature: 22 - 25 °C
    pH Value: 5.0 - 6.0
    Fish Size: 50-80(200) cm
    Food: Frozen food, Live food, Dry flakes
    Care: Aggressive, Group
    S08245.jpg

  5. #1745
    Speartooth shark (Glyphis Glyphis)

    The speartooth shark is a requiem shark, one of six species of shark that can also inhabit freshwater. This is a very rare and little known shark that usually enters into large tropical rivers of northern Australia and New Guinea. With a short snout and large teeth it can measure up to 3 meters long and has adapted to hunt for big fish in dark murky water.
    r492370_2560586.jpg

    Smalltooth sand tiger (Odontaspis ferox)

    The smalltooth sand tiger is a big shark related to the bull shark as they both belong to the Odontaspididae family. The smalltooth sand tiger can grow up to three meters long and has a large snout. This shark inhabits sandy bottoms up to 420 meters deep in a wide distribution throughout the world, including the Atlantic Ocean, the Azores Islands and the Canary Islands where a few years ago it was commonly seen in El Hierro. It can also be found in the Yucatan Peninsula, Brazil, Indian and Pacific oceans.
    Smalltooth-sand-tiger-shark-portrait.jpg

  6. #1746
    Zebra Bullhead Shark (Heterodontus zebra)

    Bullheads sharks get their name from their large heads: the heavy brow bone over each eye gives them a bull-like appearance.
    This species reaches a maximum known length of about 1.25 m (4.13 ft).

    Habitat and Range: The Zebra Bullhead Shark inhabits shallow waters in the western Pacific Ocean and Indian Ocean, on the continental and island shelves of northwestern Australia and eastern Asia (including Japan, Korea, China, Viet Nam and Indonesia). It has typically been recorded at depths around 50 m (164 ft), but inhabits even deeper waters in Australian, down to around 150-200 m (495-660 ft). Very little is known about the biology and life history of this species. Bullheads are associated with rocky reefs and sea bottom habitats, where they wiggle clumsily as they swim around. No information is available about populations, although the species is known to be common within its range.
    zebra-bullhead-shark.jpg

    Port Jackson Shark (Heterodontus portusjacksoni)

    Port Jackson Shark Facts: The dorsal fins’ spines are thought to be the source of one of the family’s common names, “Horn sharks”. According to many on-line sources, these spines are reputed to be venomous. It sounded fishy to us (pun intended), and we could not find reliable support of the claim – in fact, one resource from the University of Michigan said that they are NOT venomous. The spines of juveniles can be quite sharp, but they become duller with age. Spines wash up beaches, and have reportedly been confused for objects from bird beaks to goat horns.

    Habitat and Range: The distribution of the Port Jackson shark covers the tropical marine waters of southern Australian, from south Queensland to Tasmania, and west to the central coast of Western Australia. Genetic evidence indicates the possibility of two distinct populations.

    Feeding Behavior: This is a nocturnal shark that feeds at night when their prey species are most active. The diet consists mainly of sea urchins. Prey items also include small fish, and benthic invertebrates such as sea stars, polychaete worms, gastropods, prawns, crabs and small fish.
    port-jackson-shark-1.jpg

  7. #1747
    Nomeus gronovii, Man-of-war fish

    Nomeus gronovii, the man-of-war fish, or bluebottle fish, is a species of fish in the family Nomeidae, the driftfish. It is native to the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans, where adults are generally found at depths from 200 to 1,000 m (660 to 3,280 ft). It is notable for its ability to live within the deadly tentacles of a siphonophore, the Portuguese man o' war, upon whose tentacles and gonads it feeds. The fish is striped with blackish-blue blemishes covering its body, and the caudal fin is extremely forked. It can reach a length of 39 cm (15 in). It is of minor importance to commercial fisheries. This species is the only known member of its genus.
    2268_1817.jpg

    Petromyzon marinus, Sea lamprey

    Distribution and status in the Baltic Sea region : The sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) is distributed throughout the HELCOM area, but is very rare in
    most basins. It may have been more common in the past but in the Baltic Proper and the Gulfs it has
    been very rare at least since the early 1800s.

    Habitat and ecology: The sea lamprey is an anadromous long distance migrating species. Adults enter freshwater habitats in
    late winter or spring and migrate upstream to their spawning sites. The spawning habitat consists of
    gravel bottoms with isolated larger pebbles or rocks and adjacent clean sandy areas, where sea lamprey
    spawns from June to July. After spawning, the adults normally die. The larvae stay near the spawning
    site for 2–5 years and bury in the sand, where they feed on micro-organisms and detritus. After
    metamorphosis, they migrate downstream to the sea, where they live parasitic on fish and mammal
    species, sucking blood and feeding on skin and musculature (Fricke 1987).
    Screenshot_1.jpg

  8. #1748
    Guillet´s goby, Lebetus guilleti

    Distribution and status in the Baltic Sea region: In the HELCOM area the Guillet´s goby is known to occur occasionally at least in the Kattegat but the
    species may occur further south as well (Froese & Pauly 2012). Its small body size (<3 cm) makes it
    elusive and difficult to notice.

    Habitat and ecology: A marine, demersal species found near shore down to 30 meters deep. The Guillet´s goby lives close to
    sand, shell or gravel bottoms, where its colouration works as camouflage.
    Screenshot_3.jpg

    Lesser spotted dogfish /Small-spotted catshark

    Distribution and status in the Baltic Sea region: The lesser spotted dogfish is a small and widespread catshark, living in coastal areas from West Africa to
    Norway. The species is considered one of the most abundant shark species in the Northeast Atlantic.

    Habitat and ecology: The lesser spotted dogfish is a demersally living shark species found at depths of 3–110 m, rarely to 400
    m. It is oviparous with a single egg laid per oviduct at a time, spawning in November to July and attaches
    its egg-cases to algae and sea-grasses. Juveniles hatch after 8–9 months of development.
    Screenshot_1.jpg

  9. #1749
    Ambloplites constellatus, Ozark Bass

    Size: Maximum size: 19 cm.

    Native Range: Upper White River drainage in Arkansas and Missouri.
    20050819155146.jpg

    Anabas testudineus, climbing perch

    Size: 25 cm.

    Native Range: Tropical Asia. Native to India, Sri Lanka, Burma, Southeast Asia, southern China, and Malaysia. Inhabits fresh and brackish waters.
    1374494684_anabas_3.jpg

    Thorichthys meeki, Firemouth Cichlid

    Size: to ~12 cm SL (Miller et al. 2005); average length ~4-5 cm.

    Native Range: Tropical America. Atlantic Slope drainages in Middle America from the Ríos Grijalva and Usumacinta basins of Mexico and Guatemala, and the Yucatan Peninsula south to southern Belize.

    Ecology: Primarily a benthic omnivore, consuming detritus, molluscs, copepods, cladocerans, and insects by sifting through the bottom substrate.
    20051102114756.jpg

  10. #1750
    Standard Common Name, Brier Shark

    ANIMAL SPECIES:
    Brier Shark, Deania calcea (Lowe, 1839)
    The Brier Shark is a deepwater species that lives on continental and insular slopes. The species is normally light or dark grey to dark brown.

    A Brier Shark caught off New South Wales
    A Brier Shark caught off New South Wales
    Photographer: Ken Graham © Ken Graham @ DPI Fisheries

    Standard Common Name
    Brier Shark

    Identification: The genus Deania contains a second Australian species, the Longsnout Dogfish, Deania quadrispinosa. The most obvious difference between them is the shape of the first dorsal fin. In the Brier Shark it is long and low, but the first dorsal fin of the Longsnout Dogfish is higher and has a shorter base. The Brier Shark is normally light or dark grey to dark brown.

    Size range: It grows to 1.13 m in length.

    Habitat: The Brier Shark is a deepwater species that lives on continental and insular slopes. It is usually recorded from depths of 400 m to 900 m, although it has been recorded from as shallow as 70 m and to depths of 1450 m.

    Feeding and Diet: The species feeds on fishes and crustaceans.
    brier-shark-deania-calcea-FPH2B3.jpg

    Largetooth Cookiecutter Shark

    The largetooth cookiecutter shark (Isistius plutodus) is a rare species of dogfish shark in the family Dalatiidae, reported from depths of 60–200 m (200–660 ft) at scattered locations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.

    Distribution and habitat: Much rarer than I. brasiliensis, only ten specimens of largetooth cookiecutter shark are known, caught from a handful of widely scattered localities: off Alabama in the United States, Bahia in Brazil, the Azores, and Western Sahara in the Atlantic Ocean, and off Okinawa and New South Wales in the Pacific. Those captures were made in the epipelagic zone 60–200 m (200–660 ft) down, close to land over continental shelves, continental slopes, or oceanic trenches that may descend as far as 6.44 km (4.00 mi).[1] The shark's rarity may be due to a restricted distribution or, more likely, it normally preferring deeper waters
    isistius plutodus i-28924-0.jpg

 

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